Bob Baker's Indie Music Promotion Blog

Music marketing ideas for DIY artists, managers, promoters and music biz pros


January 31, 2005

New Software Predicts Hit Song Potential

If you've ever considered promoting one of your songs to the masses, you've probably asked a couple of age-old questions: "Does this song sound like a hit?" and "What's the best way to promote this song?" Well, get ready for a brand-new question you may be hearing a lot more in the coming months and years: "Does this song have optimal mathematical patterns?"

That's right. The Spanish company Polyphonic HMI has developed a piece of software called Hit Song Science (HSS). A growing number of major record labels and even indie artists are using it to help predict whether new, untested songs have the potential to become pop hits. And it has a short but potent track record: HSS reportedly predicted the huge success of Norah Jones, Maroon 5 and other hot acts.

How does it work? According to an article in the Guardian, HSS "isolated and separated 20 aspects of song construction including melody, harmony, chord progression, beat, tempo and pitch and identifies and maps recurrent patterns in a song, before matching it against a database containing 30 years' worth of Billboard hit singles ... The program then accords the song a score, which registers the likelihood of it being a chart success."

Yes, that means it turns your song into a mathematical equation. Kinda makes you feel all warm and fuzzy inside, doesn't it? Of course, there are detractors who deplore the cold analysis of music and point out that the score only reflects comparisons to music of the past and can't predict the breakthrough trends that only come from artistic experimentation.

But believe it or not, there is a possible upside for up-and-coming talent. For instance, an act's HSS score might actually show a record company that a baby band has more hit potential than the label's executives thought.

Plus, the software separates songs into clusters, showing which artists have similar mathematical qualities. That could help an act determine the best artists to cross-promote with. (See my Who Do You Sound Like? post for more info on why this is important.)

At least one radio station is using HSS to widen its playlist without losing listeners by "selecting songs with the correct mathematical rhythms."

Don't worry, I'm not encouraging the use of this new technology. Just wanted to make you aware of it, along with its uses and abuses. It still comes down to you creating the music you were meant to create, finding an audience and encouraging them to help you spread the buzz. In my book, that adds up to the best formula for success.

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posted by Bob Baker @ 9:36 AM   0 comments


January 28, 2005

Don't Be an E-mail Idiot

I've often described e-mail this way: It's so easy to use, and so easy to abuse.

Case in point. Here's a message I received a couple of weeks ago:

Subject line: Find Live Music Venues, Musicians, Bands

Body text: "Hey, I thought you might be interested in a web site that is dedicated to helping venues, bands, and musicians network with each other all across the country ..."

At the end of the e-mail was this gem:

"You are receiving this message because your e-mail address is listed on a musician related web site and we thought you might be interested. Please note this is not SPAM, we do not have a mailing list, we do not share or sell your address to anyone ... Thanks!"

Uh, excuse me, but if you randomly grab my e-mail address off of a "musician related web site" and add me to a bulk mail list that gets your lame message, this is SPAM. If I had only received one of these messages, it might not have been so bad. But I received 17 of the exact same message. You can deny it till you're fuchsia in the face, but if you do this, you're a spammer.

It's okay to hunt down someone's e-mail address on a web site and send them a personal message. Within reason, it's also accepted to compile a small list of media people or music acquaintances and send them a sensible, relevant "bulk" e-mail.

But, for God's sake, don't use software that harvests e-mail addresses from "musician related web sites" en masse, and don't rent e-mail lists from companies that do. This is not a shortcut to reaching the masses. It's a sure-fire route to being branded an Internet jackass.

Here's another e-mail I received last week:

Body text: "Dear sir I have an eclectic original cd of cw,country pop,pop,rr,rb quasi hip hop,rb, folk, blues instrumental, etc. I would like to submit a copy for airplay. If possible email me the name of person receiving and the address, if your intrested, and I will get it right out to you in the mail."

What can I say about this one? Typos, for starters. A description that tries to be all things to all people and ends up being nothing to no one. I could go on, but you get the idea.

Conclusion: Don't be an e-mail idiot!

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posted by Bob Baker @ 3:01 PM   0 comments


January 24, 2005

Who Do You Sound Like? And Why It's Important

Admit it. Most musicians hate to compare themselves to other artists. Does this describe you? If you feel you are a unique, one-of-a-kind creative being, I wholeheartedly agree with you. But if you think you shouldn't tarnish your musical identity with comparisons to other artists, I ask you to reconsider.

Why? It has everything to do with this crazy little hunk of matter called the human brain. According to the Berkeley Lab, "Humans retrieve information best when it can be linked to other related information." In other words, without a familiar reference point, people have a tough time filing away and remembering new sights, sounds, etc.

In this article by Allen Barker, he writes, "Memory is a dynamic process. It arises from reminders and cues." The process that helps the brain sort out new stimulus is called "associative memory." Barker continues, "An associative memory is a memory system that takes an input 'key' and produces the 'closest' stored memory that matches that key. If the memory had stored a picture of a chair, for example, and were presented with a 'key' of half a chair, it would fill in the remaining half of the chair."

If you think this is all impractical mumbo jumbo, check out the service being offered by Savage Beast. It's Music Genome Project is a system that analyzes music using "a set of attributes that capture not only the musical identity of a song, but also many significant qualities that are relevant to understanding the musical preferences of consumers who browse the material. Each song is analyzed along 400 distinct musical attributes to create a complete musical analysis."

Sounds deep, but in essence, the Savage Beast research works much like Amazon's "customers who bought X also purchased Y" recommendations. This is very much an extension of what I discussed in my recent Long Tail post.

Another site that understands the importance of this concept is WeSoundLike.com. The home page reads "Find new music like your favorite music! Just browse for your favorite music artists and we'll tell you the new and upcoming artists that are influenced by them!" Go to the submission page to add your act.

Convinced yet? Music fans need clues. People who enjoy your music also enjoy other artists. And many of those artists are more familiar to the masses than you are right now. So tap into the mental links that already exist in the minds of fans who support other similar-sounding artists.

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posted by Bob Baker @ 11:22 AM   5 comments


January 21, 2005

'What's Wrong with American Idol?' Revisited

It's back. Season four of the hugely popular "reality" show is once again setting viewership records. I admit it's great fun to watch, but what worries me is the misguided impression the show gives the public (including aspiring artists) about the modern "realities" of pursuing a music career.

Last spring, midway through season three, I launched a personal campaign to set the record straight. Next week I will post an updated "What's Wrong with American Idol?" manifesto. In the meantime, you might enjoy hearing this radio interview I did last year with Bill Reker on KMOX (1120 AM) in St. Louis.

Check back next week for my list of American Idol myths.

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posted by Bob Baker @ 10:27 AM   4 comments


January 19, 2005

Four Indie Music Sales & Exposure Sources

Today's post is all about making you aware of some cool places that can help you reach a wider audience.

The first is Magnatune, which describes itself using the slogan "We're a record label. But we're not evil." The site makes non-exclusive deals with indie artists it selects and splits the gross revenues from download sales. Read founder/owner John Buckman's page on Why I Created Magnatune and see if you agree with his philosophy. I do. Submission instructions can be found here.

On Feb. 1, my pal and fellow author Joe Taylor Jr. will launch TryTunes.com. According to Joe, it will be a daily podcast designed to drop new music right to your desktop or MP3 player. He encourages indie artists to submit their songs to the site. Read this recent blog post for more details.

Fluxblog is one of the more popular destinations among a growing number of MP3 blogs, whose owners are sometimes called "MP3Js." The purpose of an MP3 blog is to help music fans sort through the avalanche of free music now available online.

According to this article on the No Innocent Bystanders site, Fluxblog is run by Matthew Perpetua, who started posting MP3s in 2002 and now offers one or two new tracks to download on a daily basis. His site receives nearly 5,000 hits a day -- and the numbers are rising. Music fans keep coming back for the chance to hear new or obscure music, but also to read Perpetua's commentary: witty and irreverent, forthright and opinionated.

Scroll down the Fluxblog home page to the Email Fluxblog section, where you'll find submission info.

And if you are based in the U.K., check out TuneTribe, another new digital download site. This one has no sign-up fees and pays artists 80% of every purchase. Note that for tax reasons, TuneTribe can only work with artists based in the United Kingdom at this time.

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posted by Bob Baker @ 10:04 AM   1 comments


January 17, 2005

Guerrilla Music Book #3 on Amazon

Pardon the horn tooting, but I'm pretty thrilled to see that the Guerrilla Music Marketing Handbook has climbed to #3 on Amazon's Music Business Book Bestsellers list. That puts it right behind Richard Branson's Losing My Virginity and Donald Passman's All You Need to Know About the Music Business.

(At least it was #3 as of this writing. The bestseller standings change often. Click here to see a screen shot.)

I can't tell you how excited I am that this book has helped so many people and been recommended so often. Just when I think the buzz may be running its course with this title, I have another record sales month. And keep in mind that all of this momentum was created using the same indie marketing principles I cover in the book. I ignored the traditional advice on how to publish and sell a book (as I encourage you to reconsider everything you've been told about how the music business works).

Until just a few months ago (when Mel Bay Publications started distributing the book to the retail market), I never pursued retail sales or distribution at all. I've rarely spent money on advertising. Instead, I decided years ago to use the Internet to reach out and go directly to the end users -- the songwriters, musicians and band members who would benefit most from my self-promotion ideas and guerrilla philosophy. It wasn't a quick-fix strategy, because it's taken years for the buzz to slowly build -- but build it has, beyond my expectations.

I hope this serves as an example for you -- that passion, positive expectations, consistent effort and a stubborn determination to avoid a regular day job can pay off ... if you have a quality product that your target market expresses an interest in.

Another thing: Amazon recently started selling the Guerrilla Music book at a 15% discount, and I sometimes sell new, autographed copies at a discount as an Amazon Marketplace title. See the book's main Amazon sales page for details. Of course, you can always order an autographed copy from the Buzz Factor site at any time.

Thanks for your support and for allowing me to keep this train rolling!

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posted by Bob Baker @ 2:25 PM   1 comments


January 14, 2005

Live Guerrilla Music Marketing Workshop Audio Clip

As part of my new effort to enhance the way you get useful information from my blog and web sites, here's a six-minute audio segment from a live workshop I did last year in Nashville. On it I cover "Building a Solid Foundation" for a long-term independent music career. Enjoy!

Listen HiFi - Listen LoFi - Download It (4.2 megs)

Note: This audio segment is part of my Guerrilla Music Marketing LIVE audio CD.

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posted by Bob Baker @ 11:03 AM   1 comments


January 13, 2005

Radio Airplay: What's an Indie Musician to Do?

We all know that extensive radio exposure can do wonders for an artist's career. But everyone also knows that widespread radio airplay is very tough (not to mention expensive) to achieve.

I'm a big advocate of not falling victim to traditional knee-jerk music promotion methods. Just because the superstars are all over the radio doesn't mean you need it to start building a career. Many acts prosper by putting an emphasis on live shows or the Internet and do quite well without radio exposure at all.

However, it can't hurt to educate yourself on this aspect of the industry. To give you more insight into radio promotion, here are a few choice links and excerpts to get you thinking:

In his article Best Time of Year to Push Radio, promoter Bryan Farrish says ...

"Many people, when planning the date that their radio campaign will start, think that starting the campaign at a certain time of the year will make a huge difference in the outcome of the project. It won't. There are many other factors which are far more important ... Things like sequentially pushing a second and third release from the same artist; not abandoning a campaign until awareness has been built; providing the proper packaging; and properly choosing album vs. single."
Farrish also works with authors and experts who want to be featured as guests on radio talk shows. I've long believed that talk shows are sadly overlooked by most musicians. But if you have an appealing cause or theme related to your music, and if you can articulate your position well (meaning you sound halfway smart and passionate about your subject), talk shows could be a great way to get radio exposure.

Read Farrish's Why Radio Interviews? article for more details.

Jeri Goldstein, author of How to Be Your Own Booking Agent, offers a good overview in her article, How to Use Radio Promotion to Boost Airplay and Build New Audiences. Here's a sample of her wisdom:
"If you tour within a specific region or remain close to your home base, it may prove more cost effective for you to manage your own radio promotion. Although some regions of the country do have radio promotions companies that concentrate solely on a single region, most conduct national promotions campaigns ...

"When touring is restricted to one area, it is easier to select tour cities and research the appropriate radio stations on your own, city by city, as you need them. Your costs are then spread out over an extended period, as are the necessary promo CDs. You are able to concentrate on each city you intend to tour. The main concern for you is scheduling time to send the promo CDs, make initial calls to the station to check on the CD arrival, and then at least once a week make a follow-up call to check on the airplay the CD is receiving. This is no small task and it is time consuming."
And for specific indie radio contacts, I discovered this Evor Indie Radio Links directory. The copyright notice on the page shows 2003, so I'm not sure how current these are, but they're worth a look.

Other radio-related resources:

Fundamentals of DIY Radio Promotion, a new e-book by "Notorious" Liz Koch, who's worked with EMI and Tommy Boy Records.

The Indie Music Bible, featuring 3,400 radio stations around the world that may play your songs.

musicSUBMIT, a cool new service that will submit your info to Internet radio stations and other media outlets.

Radio is just one potential part of a music marketing plan. Look through these resources and decide for yourself how much of a priority you need to make it.

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posted by Bob Baker @ 3:33 PM   1 comments


January 12, 2005

I'm a Finalist in the Long Tail Definition Sweepstakes

A couple of weeks ago I published a blog post titled Are You Wired to Profit from The Long Tail? In it I discussed an article written by Wired magazine's editor-in-chief Chris Anderson, who is now writing a book on the subject and posting regular additions to his blog.

Last week, Anderson solicited suggestions for a succinct way to describe what the Long Tail is. I posted a phrase along with dozens of other blog readers.

Well, what do you know: Anderson listed me as a Long Tail definition "finalist" in this Jan. 9 post. Look under the Best Definitions heading. Very cool. By the way, here's my suggested definition:

"The Long Tail is the story of how products that were once considered fringe, underground or independent now collectively make up a market share that rivals the bestsellers and blockbusters."

I'm preparing my acceptance speech now :-)

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posted by Bob Baker @ 9:40 AM   0 comments


January 11, 2005

The Future of Music: Flowing Like Water?

Gerd Leonhard and David Kusek, coauthors of the new book "The Future of Music," have some strong views on the current state and future direction of the music business. Their book is described as a "manifesto for the digital music revolution."

Here are some thoughts from Leonhard in an article he wrote called "Music Like Water: The Inevitable Music Ecosystem":

"I strongly believe we are heading into a 'music like water' future, based on this very simple fact: today, there are more people in more places around the globe that are tuning into music with more enthusiasm and sheer determination than ever before, and they are using a myriad of their own particular ways and means to get what they want. And to a large degree the 'traditional' record industry is simply no longer invited to the party - the bottom line is that consumer empowerment has finally reached the music business, and many consumers have now taken charge of their own entertainment."

Leonhard asserts that flat-fee, subscription-based services will be more attactive to music-hungry fans (and better for artists) than the iTunes-like, pay-per-download model.

"Once we can subscribe to music just like we subscribe to water, the music business will EXPLODE and we will enter a new ecosystem that will make the previous music industry look like NY taxicabs from the 30th floor of the BMG building ...

"There's only one thing: we MUST stop asking the consumers to fill up their bath tubs with Evian, or to use Pellegrino to boil pasta -- they have already discovered the tab water! So let's just sell them tap water, via cheap flat fee deals, AND the Pellegrino, as well -- and this does not equal a flat-out, wholesale devaluation of music; quite the contrary. Ubiquity is a very powerful thing, and will create a nice pool of money for all involved parties -- a pool which will only be the very first starting point for a much increased monetization of music.

"Once music is unleashed and we can stop the dinosaurial fight for the simple privilege of having access to it, distribution seizes to be a barrier to entry: all music, all artists and all writers will be in those pipelines. Then, however, artists and their representatives will be facing the real challenge: getting anyone to pay attention to them, and surviving in this world of 'digital darwinism', since the old marketing mantra of Exposure + Discovery = Sales (Income) will be even more pronounced in a Music-Like-Water world.

"Ultimately, of course, people will consume, or shall we say, use more media (music) all the time, yes, but the real limiting factor is people's TIME. Simply put, all of the world's music (and its creators) will be competing for attention in this new ecosystem, and everyone will want a piece if your precious time. THAT will be the real challenge going forward: getting exposure and being discovered -- the rest is already build into the pipeline. So, brave new music ecosystem -- yes, but not a build-in goldmine."

Read the entire article at www.futureofmusicbook.com

What do you think? Agree with him? Have an opposing view? Post your thoughts here.

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posted by Bob Baker @ 1:21 PM   9 comments


January 10, 2005

Update: Stream Your Music with Webjay

A big thanks to Lucas Gonze, who runs Webjay.org, for responding to my Friday, Jan. 7, post on How to Stream Audio From Your Web Site. As I've discovered, there are a lot of quirks with using m3u files from your own server.

Lucas made me aware of a nifty little utility on his site that can "make these problems go away." What Webjay.org does is help users create playlists of media files across the web. It doesn't host the files. Instead, it links to them and creates streaming playlists of the songs you choose. Very cool.

Here's how to use Webjay to stream music from your own web site ...

Let's say the full URL to your MP3 file is http://mydomain.com/mysong.mp3

What you do is add that URL to the web address http://webjay.org/insta.m3u?url=

So the final link in your HTML would be http://webjay.org/insta.m3u?url=http://mydomain.com/mysong.mp3

Once again, I'll use my own audio as an example. Only this time, I'll stream a couple of original songs. This first one was just recorded last month with my friend Mike Silverman. I was aiming for a Crowded House/Squeeze vibe on this song:

Sin On Your Face (note that it's Sin and not Sit)
Listen HiFi OR Listen LoFi

Yes, I wrote the song and that's me on vocals and guitar. And here's a more rockin' tune from my old band Roomful of Jimmys, circa 1998:

Another Day Behind Me
Listen HiFi OR Listen LoFi

Did that work better than the streams on my previous post? I think it's a pretty cool utility. Thanks to Lucas Gonze and Webjay for providing it!

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posted by Bob Baker @ 1:49 PM   6 comments


January 07, 2005

How to Stream Audio From Your Web Site

This should be no secret to a web-savvy music marketer like you, but I'll state the obvious anyway: You must give music fans a way to hear your music on the Web. And to really prove that you're a smart cookie, you should give people the option of streaming your audio clips or downloading them.

One of the easiest ways to do this is to send people to your page at CD Baby or GarageBand or some other music site, since these services usually automate the process for you. However, I just discovered a fairly simple way to set up both options from my own web site.

(Note: The streaming option works when using Internet Explorer, but for some reason it doesn't work with Firefox, which is growing in popularity. For now, though, most people still use IE.)

Okay, here's what I did. Follow these steps with your own audio files:

1. Using the free MusicMatch Jukebox, I took a spoken word segment from my Artist Empowerment Radio show and converted it to a 32kpbs MP3 file. I reduced it to that rate to make it easy for people with dial-up connections to stream it. I named the file make.mp3

2. I opened a new blank Notepad file (any simple text editor will do) and entered the complete URL of the MP3 file on my server, which is

http://www.bob-baker.com/musicpromotionblog/make.mp3

I saved this file with the name make.m3u

3. Then within the HTML of this page that you're reading, I used this code:

<a href="make.m3u" type="audio/mpeg">Stream It</a>

Note that it links to the simple .m3u text file I just created and includes a message to let the browser know that this link references an audio file.

I also added the following code that links directly to the MP3 file -- for people who want to download this file to their hard drives:

<a href="/make.mp3">Download It</a>

4. Then, using my FTP client, I uploaded the make.m3u file using ACSII and the make.mp3 using the Binary setting. Both files were placed in the same folder on my server as this page.

And that's it. Ready to try it out? Click the links below:

Stream It or Download It

Note: You might want to make a separate 128kpbs MP3 version for the downloadable file. The 32kpbs version is easier to stream, but the sound quality is considerably less.

Here are some other resources that cover delivering streaming audio on the Web:
If you have any tech tips on how to make this work better, please post a response here or send an e-mail to Bob AT TheBuzzFactor.com -- be sure to replace AT with @.

Also, soon I plan to try an inexpensive software program called MP3 Sound Stream, which uses Flash-based streaming files. Many people rave about it. I'll keep you posted.

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posted by Bob Baker @ 11:15 AM   14 comments


January 05, 2005

How to Do Your Own Music Publicity

Ariel Hyatt, of Ariel Publicity, has a number of good articles on music PR posted on her web site.

Be sure to check out How to Be Your Own Publicist, described as "a step-by-step guide to garnering maximum attention for your band."

And this article spells out the three PR components you should include on your web site.

Here's Ariel on persevere:
"It may take a few passes through in each market, but the more a writer sees you over time, the more likely he will write about you. And don't let voice mail discourage you. I have placed hundreds of articles, mentions and photos without ever speaking to the writer.

"Writers usually respond much better to e-mail -- it's free for them and does not take too long to respond to. If you are sending e-mail followups, put a link to your site, or the club's site if you don't have one."
Sage advice.

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posted by Bob Baker @ 3:43 PM   3 comments


January 03, 2005

How to Make This Year (and This Month) Great for Your Music Career

While at the public library last week, a U.S. News & World Report magazine cover jumped out at me. The large typeface screamed "50 Ways to Improve Your Life in 2005." I picked it up, thumbed through a few pages and was so impressed I immediately headed to the nearest bookstore to buy a copy. Luckily, the entire issue (Dec. 27 - Jan. 3) is posted online.

The 52-page section covers practically everything a human can do to live, work and play better. From setting priorities and learning to meditate to quitting your job and listening to new music. There are even sections on why you're better off when you fix your finances, master your data and have more sex. Sounds like a good plan to me.

If you haven't read it in a while, this would be a good time to revisit 10 Ways to 'Make' This Your Best Music Year Ever, an article I wrote a year ago, filled with some timeless music success concepts. (Sorry, I haven't yet updated this page with the new design of my site.)

Also, are you taking advantage of January? This is a month when a lot of people make purchases -- books, music and more. Your fans have Christmas money to spend, they may be getting cabin fever in winter and need a little boost to spice up their lives. Plus, this is a month you can stand out, since the major labels usually ignore the post-holiday season.

What should you do? Promote yourself more vigorously this month. Make special offers. Have a limited-time discount sale. Offer free shipping. Announce a special buy-two, get-one-free sale. Do something cool. In fact, I'm doing this very thing this month with my own New Year's Buzz Bundles.

Your fans need something to keep them going now that the holidays are over. Why not help them with your music and merchandise?

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posted by Bob Baker @ 11:05 AM   0 comments


January 01, 2005

Ten Tips on Setting and Reaching Your Goals

Ready to make the most of your music in 2005? To help you rev up your ambition engine, I'm sharing this great article from Gary Ryan Blair, also known as the Goals Guy.

Ten Mind Munchies from the Goals Guy

1. A goal is created three times. First as a mental picture. Second, when written down to add clarity and dimension. And third, when you take action towards its achievement.

2. Focus creates a powerful force: goal power. The moment you focus on a goal, your goal becomes a magnet, pulling you and your resources toward it. The more focused your energies, the more power you generate. There is a seismic shift in performance that takes place when you move from decisiveness to focus. The shift is caused, enhanced, and accelerated by the intensity of your focus.

3. If how you play or perform were all that mattered, then why do all sporting activities have some form of scoreboard? Keeping score and inspecting your progress is important, not only in determining the ultimate winner of a contest, but also as a measuring device by which a person, team or company can gauge itself against the competition.

4. Nothing of any lasting value was ever created by someone who was reasonable. It is the unreasonable people, those discontented with the status quo, the dreamers and visionaries who nevertheless have their feet planted firmly on solid ground who improve people's lives and advance society.

5. From eureka to achievement, the evolution of a goal begins in the mind and immediately takes shape when pen is put to paper. The goal progresses from thought to sketch, from sketch to action, and finally from action to achievement in real time. The achievement of a goal is an exemplary tale of power, purpose, and potential.

6. The essence of success is a narrow focus. You become stronger, your vision clearer, your resolve deeper when you reduce the scope of your options. You can’t stand for something if you chase everything.

7. Why you want to achieve a goal is more important than the goal itself. Before taking action on anything it is imperative that you ask yourself this key question: "Why do I want to achieve this goal?"

8. The success of your life is not measured by one extraordinary achievement but by the consistency by which you go about all matters.

9. The truth will prevail, one way or another and usually sooner rather than later. It is better to face facts and reality at the planning phase, and to convince others to do the same. This is not for the sake of building character or maintaining mortality. It is a matter of survival. Whether or not you face it, truth will create consequences!

10. There will never be a day that will not require dedication, discipline, good judgment, energy, and the feeling that you can improve. Each day offers an opportunity for improvement. Each moment an advance or retreat in the pursuit of your goals.

Gary Ryan Blair is President of The GoalsGuy. A visionary and gifted conceptual thinker, Gary is highly regarded as a speaker, consultant, strategic planner, and coach to leading companies throughout the globe. Visit The GoalsGuy at www.GoalsGuy.com.

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posted by Bob Baker @ 3:25 PM   2 comments