Bob Baker's Indie Music Promotion Blog

Music marketing ideas for DIY artists, managers, promoters and music biz pros


June 29, 2005

Spreading Music Tips Around the World

In case you didn't know it, many of my articles, as well as the posts that appear on this blog, are freely available for use on other web sites, blogs and e-zines. Interested? Get all the details on reprint rights here.

I may start regularly listing some of the many cool sites where my words are being shared with musicians around the world. Here are two new ones from the past week alone:

Australia-based musician Corey Stewart used my "The True Meaning of INDIE" article on his The Bizzo - Indie Music Industry Tips blog. He also runs a nice songwriting tips blog at www.coreystewartonline.com.

Stewart writes, "I am an Aussie singer-songwriter who just wants to network worldwide, develop a sense of community (something that is missing in our society) and help people out along the way by getting all of the info I have collected over 15 or so years of active musical service and putting it all on the web."

Cheers to that!

Also, my recent "Internet Music Promotion Principle #1" post was just published in Guitar News Weekly, a discussion forum for guitar players.

It's very gratifying to know that good people are spreading the word. Thanks!

Get more tips like these when you subscribe to my free Buzz Factor ezine — the longest running music career tips email newsletter on the planet. Since 1995. Learn more about the free subscription here.


Or just sign up using this quick and easy form:

Your First Name
Your Primary Email


Your email address will not be shared. Unsubscribe at any time.

Connect with

posted by Bob Baker @ 3:26 PM   2 comments


June 27, 2005

Avoid One Potential Problem with MySpace

My pal Joe Taylor Jr posted a good piece of advice on his spinme.com blog regarding the ever-popular MySpace.com -- which more and more musicians are using to create a home on the Web and network with fans.

Here is part of his post:
Yes, MySpace is a pretty efficient way to quickly build a web presence. Many talent buyers still have a problem with the way that bands over-rely on it for draw, but if you don't have a web guru on your team yet, it's a simple way to get online fast.

However, if you're only giving out your MySpace.com address, you're risking a lot. For example:

* What happens if the bandmate who starts the MySpace account leaves/gets kicked out? One of my clients is going nuts trying to get this account back, especially since the ex-bandmate is now using the "friends" to slag off the old band and get folks to come out to see the new one.

* What happens if something ever happens to MySpace? Folks may laugh, but there was a time when lots of us thought MP3.com and IUMA would be eternal.
Joe's solution is registering and promoting your own domain name (something you should do anyway, especially considering it costs as little as 8 bucks a year) and directing it to your MySpace URL. You can even "mask" it so your domain name continues to appear in the user's browser even when they're on the MySpace site.

As master of your own domain name, you can point it wherever you want. And while the final destination might change, your web address remains the same.

Great advice!
Get more tips like these when you subscribe to my free Buzz Factor ezine — the longest running music career tips email newsletter on the planet. Since 1995. Learn more about the free subscription here.


Or just sign up using this quick and easy form:

Your First Name
Your Primary Email


Your email address will not be shared. Unsubscribe at any time.

Connect with

posted by Bob Baker @ 9:40 AM   4 comments


June 21, 2005

Internet Music Promotion Principle #4: Focus on the Most Important Factor That Determines Your Success

This is the final blog post covering the four most important principles of Internet music marketing. If you missed the first three, you should probably read principles #1, #2 and #3 first.

Musicians venture onto the Web for all sorts of reasons
. Some put up a web site just because everybody else is doing it or because they think it's the best way to impress industry people. Others establish an Internet presence because they think search engines will list their site and drive traffic to it while they sleep.

What's the real reason you should promote yourself online? Here's my best answer, and you should apply this concept to just about every action you take to promote your music, online and off:

Your main focus should be to attract and start relationships with a growing number of fans. No other factor will influence your level of success like a large and enthusiastic fan base. It doesn't matter how impressive your record label, attorney, manager, publicist or radio promotions person is. None of that means squat if fans don't connect with you. However, you can have no label deal, attorney, manager, etc., and still be a huge success if you have fans -- and lots of them.

Fans are the only thing that count (along with the quality of your music and your integrity), so put a priority on courting them. Use the unique interactive qualities of the Web to communicate with people interested in your music. Get to know them. Allow them to get to know you and the intimate details that led you to create the music they enjoy so much.

Forget all the hype and distractions and put your focus where it needs to be the most: on fans!

Get more tips like these when you subscribe to my free Buzz Factor ezine — the longest running music career tips email newsletter on the planet. Since 1995. Learn more about the free subscription here.


Or just sign up using this quick and easy form:

Your First Name
Your Primary Email


Your email address will not be shared. Unsubscribe at any time.

Connect with

posted by Bob Baker @ 10:05 PM   0 comments


June 17, 2005

Internet Music Promotion Principle #3: You Feelin' Me, Dawg? Tap Into the Mind, Body and Soul

To effectively promote yourself on the Internet, you must "sell" yourself. That doesn't mean you have to "sell out" and degrade your integrity. But it does mean you must reach out and communicate who you are and why people should care.

So what's the best way to do that? How do you get the attention of fans? Do you accomplish that by announcing where you're from, who produced your CD, how many music awards you've won, and what process you used to master your latest recording?

No. Those details can help persuade some people, but most folks will become fans for a reason that has nothing to do with the facts and features of your musical product. They will be attracted to you because of the way your music and personality make them feel. That's right, feel.

The most powerful response you can get from someone is based on emotion and the way your music affects them physically and mentally, and sometimes spiritually. In the Guerrilla Music Marketing Handbook, I refer to this mysterious phenomenon as a "state change."

Your most hardcore fans will react to your music in a way that makes them feel different (and usually much better) while they listen to your music. Their heart rate and body chemistry will actually shift when they hear your songs -- and sometimes, after they know you, the shift may occur when they only see your picture, hear you speak or read about you. Like Pavlov's dog, they salivate when you ring their bell (so to speak).

It's your job as an independent self-promoter to understand the powerful effect your music has, and to use that knowledge to spread those great feelings to even more people.

For example, you could announce, "We're a four-piece band from Kansas City. Our new CD is getting airplay on 12 stations in the Midwest." Or you could say something more "state change"-oriented like, "Our blend of rap and rock is for you if you crave an adrenaline rush with a touch of humor. Feel the edge and a good belly laugh at the same time."

See the difference? From now on, always use this principle to attract more fans.

If you missed them, be sure to read Internet music promotion principles #1 and #2. Note: These posts are excerpts from the special report 50 Ways to Promote & Sell Your Music on the Internet.

Get more tips like these when you subscribe to my free Buzz Factor ezine — the longest running music career tips email newsletter on the planet. Since 1995. Learn more about the free subscription here.


Or just sign up using this quick and easy form:

Your First Name
Your Primary Email


Your email address will not be shared. Unsubscribe at any time.

Connect with

posted by Bob Baker @ 9:59 PM   0 comments


June 15, 2005

Internet Music Promotion Principle #2: Don't Be a Fuzzy, Bone-Headed Communicator

If you're sold on the advice I dished out in the first principle, congratulations! You're miles ahead of most independent musicians. From now on you will target your marketing efforts by going to the places where your ideal fans congregate. Great. But there's a right way and a wrong way to present yourself via these targeted avenues.

One way is to mindlessly announce "Hey, here I am. Check me out." With this method, you might list a band name and a web site. You also might feel proud of yourself for taking action. Sorry, Skippy, but you haven't done yourself any favors. Most fans and industry people who view these types of senseless interruptions think, "Who cares?"

Another way is to think through the most appropriate way to communicate via each avenue (whether it's an e-mail to a webmaster, a posting to an online forum, a pitch to an online music reviewer) and act accordingly. Then, most importantly, you must be clear about who you are, what type of music you play, and what sets you apart from other similar acts.

Why do this? Because once you know where your best potential fans and media sources hang out, you need to make sure that your earliest contact with them lets them know right away that your music is something they'll probably enjoy. What will help you accomplish that most effectively? A brainless "Dude, check out my web site. See ya around."? (Believe it or not, I get a lot of e-mails like this.)

Or ... Compare that to a message along the lines of "Hi. Love your rockabilly web site. Thought you might be interested in my band, The Roadblasters. We're a rockabilly band that plays original songs mostly about cars. We're a big hit in Cincinnati and perform regularly at NASCAR and drag racing events in the region. I'd be happy to send you our new CD, 'Feels on Wheels,' or you can listen to MP3s on our web site at ..."

See the advantages of being clear about who you are and what you play? It helps you cut through the chaos and noise online. It allows the people most likely to support you to become interested in you and want to know (and hear) more. Keep this principle in mind whenever you take action to promote yourself on the Internet.

Get more tips like these when you subscribe to my free Buzz Factor ezine — the longest running music career tips email newsletter on the planet. Since 1995. Learn more about the free subscription here.


Or just sign up using this quick and easy form:

Your First Name
Your Primary Email


Your email address will not be shared. Unsubscribe at any time.

Connect with

posted by Bob Baker @ 9:54 PM   0 comments


June 13, 2005

Internet Music Promotion Principle #1: Ready, Aim, Fire! Know Where Your Target Is

This is the first of four blog posts covering the four most important principles of Internet music marketing.

It's a big world out there -- especially on the Internet. The number of Internet users worldwide is expected to exceed 1 billion people this year. That's right. Billion with a B. More than 185 million of those users are in the United States alone.

That's a lot of people surfing the Net that you can potentially reach. It's intimidating just thinking about connecting with all those people. No wonder so many musicians get frustrated and feel overwhelmed when it comes to promoting themselves online.

Have no fear. You don't have to reach all those people. You don't even have to reach all music fans online. If you try, you'll never reach your lofty goals and will curse me and Al Gore and anyone who's ever been associated with the Internet.

To successfully promote yourself online, you need to start a relationship with only a small sliver of the total number of people online. Think about these numbers: If you could reach one-hundredth of one percent of those billion people, you'd have 100,000 potential fans. That's a lot of people.

Bottom line: Don't try to be all things to all people. Don't attempt to reach a wide section of the online population. Focus your limited time and energy on the web sites, e-zines and online forums where the people most likely to be attracted to your music hang out. Got it? Good.

Keep an eye on this MusicPromotionBlog.com site for the next three Internet music marketing principles. Note: These posts are excerpts from the special report 50 Ways to Promote & Sell Your Music on the Internet.

Get more tips like these when you subscribe to my free Buzz Factor ezine — the longest running music career tips email newsletter on the planet. Since 1995. Learn more about the free subscription here.


Or just sign up using this quick and easy form:

Your First Name
Your Primary Email


Your email address will not be shared. Unsubscribe at any time.

Connect with

posted by Bob Baker @ 8:54 PM   0 comments