Bob Baker's Indie Music Promotion Blog

Music marketing ideas for DIY artists, managers, promoters and music biz pros


November 29, 2007

TAXI Road Rally in LA: What You Missed

Had a great week in Los Angeles earlier this month. Here are a few photos and captions to show you what happened and what you might have missed if you weren't there.

I was fortunate enough to spend a little time with John Braheny, author of The Craft and Business of Songwriting. He and his wife JoAnn are wonderful people.

TAXI CEO Michael Laskow (white shirt) grills panelists during the A&R panel. I'm the lone indie guy seated on the left under the A.

About 2,300 people attended the Road Rally in 2007. More than half of them crowded into the main ballroom during the A&R panel. Probably the largest crowd I've panelized in front of so far.

Gilli Moon and I presented a workshop in Philip Horváth's fantastic loft space at the Brewery Art Complex in Los Angeles. Cool space, cool people.

About 75 people or so packed into my Drivers Ed class on music promotion at theTAXI Road Rally. My one-liners were particularly effective with this lively group. (Perhaps they'd been drinking :-)

Finally got a chance to meet Jason Blume, author of 6 Steps to Songwriting Success and This Business of Songwriting.

Hanging near the famous Improv on Melrose in Hollywood. Believe it or not, 20 years ago I performed there after I won a stand-up comedy competition in St. Louis. They have since erected this fence to keep me out :-)

All photos above taken by the lovely and talented Pooki.

For more photos from this and other music events, check out my Flickr page.

-Bob

Guerrilla Music Marketing HandbookCheck out Guerrilla Music Marketing Handbook, the classic guide to indie music promotion. Now revised and updated, with four new chapters on Internet and Web 2.0 music marketing. Get more details here.


Did you enjoy this blog post? Subscribe now and get all of my newest ideas delivered by email or RSS feed. Learn how here.
Get more tips like these when you subscribe to my free Buzz Factor ezine — the longest running music career tips email newsletter on the planet. Since 1995. Learn more about the free subscription here.


Or just sign up using this quick and easy form:

Your First Name
Your Primary Email


Your email address will not be shared. Unsubscribe at any time.

Connect with

posted by Bob Baker @ 3:29 PM   0 comments


November 27, 2007

How to Sell 15,000 CDs in 18 Months

More than 1,000 people watched this video in the first three days after it was posted. It's an inspiring interview I did on a whim with musician Terry Prince, shot a couple of weeks ago on the Santa Monica Pier.


If the video player doesn't appear above, you can view it here:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUfXB5uY9KA

Do the math. He makes more than $8,000 a month/about $275 an hour playing part-time. Some people doubt his sales figures (which would average 27 CD sales per hour). But, according to Terry, "that very doubt will keep them from manifesting the desired results."

It was a rare cloudy and windy day on the pier when we shot the video. Normally, it's sunny and crowded with tourists. When you consider that his tip bucket sits right below his CDs and sales sign (which allows people to drop ten buck in and take a CD while he's playing), he really could generate 25 or more CD sales per hour.

I have no way to verify Terry's claims, but I also have no reason to doubt him. What do you think?

Pardon my hair. The wind was giving me a nice Donald Trump effect :-)

-Bob

Promote Your Music on MySpace
Ready for a Major Publicity Boost? Check out the new Indie Music Publicity Bootcamp. Ariel Hyatt and I just released an in-depth home study course filled with insider secrets on how to reach the music media and get the exposure you deserve. Get more details here.

Did you enjoy this blog post? Subscribe now and get all of my newest ideas delivered by email or RSS feed. Learn how here.
Get more tips like these when you subscribe to my free Buzz Factor ezine — the longest running music career tips email newsletter on the planet. Since 1995. Learn more about the free subscription here.


Or just sign up using this quick and easy form:

Your First Name
Your Primary Email


Your email address will not be shared. Unsubscribe at any time.

Connect with

posted by Bob Baker @ 3:47 PM   3 comments


November 23, 2007

Fear & Uncertainty at 25,000 Feet

We had only been in the air for about 20 minutes after taking off from LAX. Then something happened that immediately filled me and everyone on the plane with uncertainty -- if not outright fear.
We were headed back to St. Louis after spending an exciting, action-packed week in Los Angeles, three days of which were spent at the amazing TAXI Road Rally.

My girlfriend Pooki and I were talking about the holidays and making notes about the things we needed to do once we got back home. Suddenly, there was a weird clunking sound and a vibration in the plane.

The only thing I can compare it to is the sound made when the cargo door of a plane is slammed shut after the luggage is loaded on. Crunch and shake. You expect that when the plane is stationary on the ground. But not at 25,000 feet.

(I'm sure we hadn't reached our top flying altitude when the unexpected crunch sound came, but we were pretty damn high up there. I'm just guessing it was 25,000 feet.)

Soon after the strange sounds stopped, the plane seemed to lose a little power and made a quick turn to the left. The pilot came on soon after and informed everyone that the left engine (one of only two on the plane) had just gone out.

He did a good job of describing it as a "non-event" but said "they always like us to head back to the airport when these things happen." Since the plane was taking a straight shot back to LAX, he said we'd be back on the ground in less than 15 minutes.

Now I've heard that planes can fly just fine with one engine. The aircraft appeared to be stable in the air. None of the passengers was panicking. But another interesting thing was happening: No one was complaining about the inconvenience or the delay this might cause.

Pooki and I held each other's hand and patiently waited. I wasn't outwardly fretting, but I must admit it was the longest 15 minutes of my life. It was a situation where you feel completely helpless. There's nothing you can do to make it better except trust -- in the pilots, in the only remaining working engine, in the Universe, in whatever it is you trust your trust with.

As we safely landed, I saw right away that this "non-event" had caused dozens of emergency vehicles to line the runway. As we taxied off the runway, several trucks and police cars, with lights blazing, surrounded the plane to inspect the engine and make certain an emergency evacuation wasn't needed. It wasn't.

Within minutes, we had pulled up to a gate and were exiting the plane. Still, no one was complaining about interrupted plans. Within an hour and a half, a new plane was ready and the same passengers, pilots and flight attendants climbed aboard for a smooth, uneventful flight to St. Louis.

Even though we were never in immediate danger, this experience made me think of a lot of things -- in those tense minutes before landing back at LAX and in the days since.

Mainly, I realize more than ever that I have a lot to live for and a lot to be thankful for. Which made Thanksgiving Day extra special this year.

I'm extremely grateful for Pooki, my daughter Kelli, other members of my family, and my many friends. And I'm incredibly thankful for you, dear reader, for continuing to give me a reason to write and speak about the topics that are so important to me.

Just yesterday, on Thanksgiving, I got this heartwarming email from someone I've never met:

This Thanksgiving
I am thankful for ...
YOU
Your amazing writing
And all the great resources you put in our hands.

Hope your Thanksgiving is merry and bright, Bob.

Your random fan,
Erin

www.erinivey.com

Thanks, Erin. And thanks to all of you who make my life brighter in so many ways!

-Bob
Get more tips like these when you subscribe to my free Buzz Factor ezine — the longest running music career tips email newsletter on the planet. Since 1995. Learn more about the free subscription here.


Or just sign up using this quick and easy form:

Your First Name
Your Primary Email


Your email address will not be shared. Unsubscribe at any time.

Connect with

posted by Bob Baker @ 9:53 AM   5 comments